Apollo III User Manual - Mach3

__Use__MachMotion_Logo_HiRes_TransBG-update-01-450.png

 

WARNING!  Improper installation of this motion controller can cause DEATH, INJURY or serious PROPERTY DAMAGE. Do not attempt to install this controller until thoroughly reading and understanding this manual.

 

1  INTRODUCTION

1.1    Overview

The Apollo III is MachMotion's Ethernet motion controller. It uses differential or single-ended step and direction to control up to 6 axes with full encoder feedback (full closed loop). It also has 16 inputs, 8 outputs, excellent position resolution, two MPG inputs, and spindle encoder feedback

1.2    Tool Required

To use the Apollo III, the following items are necessary:

  • 24VDC Power Supply
  • Emergency Stop Circuit
  • Control with Mach3 and Ethernet Port
  • Small flat head screw driver

MachMotion CNC controls come with the above items, except the screw driver.

1.3    Reference Diagram

Use the diagram below as a reference throughout the manual.

Apollo3Mach3Diagram.JPG 

WARNING  DO NOT connect 115VAC to any part of the Apollo III motion controller. It could cause serious damage to the controller.

 

1.4    Status LEDs

The Apollo III has four status LEDs that show the status of the controller’s processor. The LEDs are located close to the center of the controller. See the figure below.

 StatusLEDs.JPG

Color

Label

Function

Green

PWR

Power is supplied to Apollo III

Orange

CTRL

Apollo III has an enable signal from control

Red

ERR

Apollo III has an error

Green

CPU

Apollo III CPU is running (should be flashing when power is supplied)

Table 1 - Apollo III Status LEDs

1.5    Specifications

Below are the specifications for the Apollo III motion controller.

Item

Specification

Input Power

24VDC

Max Power Consumption

48W

 

 

Axes

6

      Step and Direction Axis Control

5V Single Ended and Differential

            Connection

RJ45 Connectors and Terminal Blocks

            Max Pulse Speed

1.6 MHz

      Encoder Feedback

5V Differential

            Connection

RJ45 Connectors

            Max Frequency

6.25 MHz

 

 

Spindle

1

      Relay Outputs

Clockwise (CW) and Counterclockwise (CCW)

Analog Signal

0-10VDC

Encoder Feedback

5V Differential

 

 

Outputs

8

Voltage

7V-48VDC*

Max Current

250mA**

Commons

2

 

 

Inputs

16 (Sinking or Sourcing)

      Voltage

2.5V-48VDC

      Min Current

2mA

      Isolated

Optional

 

 

Enable Circuit

2

Hardware Enable

Relay Contacts, 5V Enable, 24V Enable

Drive Enable

Relay Contacts

 

 

Emergency Stop Circuit

Normally Closed Connection

 

 

Ethernet Port

10/100 MHz

 

 

Dimensions

8.32"(L) X 5.75"(W) X 2"(H)

Optimal Temperature Range

32° to 100°F (0° to 38°C)

Table 2 - specifications for the Apollo III motion controller

*Only 24V is provided on the motion controller. Any other voltage must be supplied.  **Commons must be supplied externally. If the commons are using the Apollo III power supply, each output can only source 125mA.

1.6    Drawing

Below is a drawing of the Apollo III.

ApolloSketch.JPG

The controller can be mounted on any solid surface that will be protected from dust and dirt. Use a minimum of 3/8 inch standoffs to prevent electrical shorts.

Scale drawing of the Apollo III and mounting case are located in Appendices.

Hardware Startup

To power the Apollo III, you must supply 24VDC to the power connection located at the top right of the board as shown below. The top orange LED labeled Power will turn on.

 pwrconnectors.JPG

1.7    Software Startup

On the desktop of your control there is a Mach3 shortcut for your machine type. Below are examples of a Mill, Lathe, and Plasma shortcut.

 Profiles.JPG

There is also a shortcut for Mach3 Loader. This allows any of the profiles to be loaded from one location. Double clicking on the Mach3 Loader shortcut opens the following window:

 M3Loader.JPG

After double clicking on a profile or opening a profile from Mach3 Loader, a window will come up asking for agreement with the Mach3 Legal Notice.

LegalNotice.JPG

When Mach3 loads, clear the [Reset] button so it is not flashing. [Reset] must be cleared for Mach3 to operate.

2  Axis Setup

2.1    Apollo lll Cover Removal

All of the drives and external I/O will be wired into the Apollo III. Begin by removing the cover by loosening the four black knobs on the sides.

ApolloCover.JPG

Note: For more information about the Apollo III see the Apollo III User’s Manual.

Next, plug the drive control and encoder cables into the Apollo III motion controller. The drive control connections are located on the bottom row of the large RJ45 block. The encoder control connections are located on the top row of the large RJ45 block. See the picture below.

RJ45ports.JPG

2.2    Enabling Axes

After the drives are connected to the Apollo III, open up Mach3, and enable the axes as follows:

Note: This may already be setup depending on your system.

  1. On the menu bar, click Config->Ports and Pins.
  2. Select the Motor Outputs tab to see the axis enable options as pictured below.

axissetupunchecked.JPGEnable all the axes that are to be controlled by setting the respective boxes in the Enabled column to green checks. In the example below, the X, Y, and Z axes are enabled.

axissetupchecked.JPG

  1. Press [OK] to save any changes and close the window.

The system is now set up for motion.

WARNING The machine can be crashed very easily. No limit switches have been set up and the units have not been configured yet.

 

2.3    Axis Calibration

For the machine to move the correct distance, the axes need to be calibrated. To get the units perfect, they must be calculated manually from the machine specifications. However, you can get them extremely close if you use the calibration wizard (see Calibration Wizard in section 2.3.2).

 Manual Calibration

Complete the following procedure to do the manual calibration:

Note: If the MachMotion plugin is not listed under PlugIn Control, see the Axis Configuration Worksheet to do the calculations by hand or use the calibration wizard in section 2.3.2. The worksheet can be found on the MachMotion website under software setup documentation.

Go to PlugIn Control->MachMotion Plugin.

  1. Select the Calibration
  2. Select the drive type of the axis being configured.
  3. Enter the max motor RPM.
  4. Enter the correct drive ratio.

Drive Ratio Apollo III

Drive Type

1

Teco

32

Mitsubishi

64

Yaskawa

1

Stepper

Table 2 – Default Drive Ratio Values

Calibration.JPG

  1. Choose the machine configuration for the axis from the following three options.
    1. Ball Screw
      1. Enter the ball screw pitch
      2. Enter the gearing ratio between the shaft and the motor

Note: If the system has a pulley ratio and a gear box use this equation to get the total gear ratio:

[Gear Box Ratio] x [Pulley Ratio] = [Total Gear Ratio]

Ex: [10:1 Gear Box] x [30 Motor Pulley Teeth/15 Shaft Pulley Teeth] =

[10] x [30/15] = [20 Total Gear Ratio]

  1. Rack and Pinion – Pinion Diameter
    1. Enter pinion diameter
    2. Enter the gearing ratio between the shaft and the motor
  2. Rack and Pinion – Rack Pitch
    1. Enter number of teeth on pinion
    2. Enter the rack pitch
  • Enter the gearing ratio between the shaft and the motor
  1. Press the [Calculate] button.
  2. Select the axis to calibrate.
  3. Press the [Calibrate Axis] button.
  4. Repeat starting at step 3 for each additional axis.
  5. Restart Mach3 to save the calibration settings.

2.3.2    Calibration Wizard

Complete the following procedure to use the calibration wizard:

  1. Run “M9990” from the MDI line.
  2. Select the axis to calibrate.
  3. Enter in the distance and federate the axis should move.
  4. Measure how far the axis moved.
  5. Enter in the distance the axis moved.
  6. Allow it to update the Steps Per Unit for that axis if the measurement was correct.
  7. Repeat this procedure until the axis is within the required accuracy.

If you want to adjust your velocity, select Config on the top menu bar, then Motor Tuning. You should see the Motor Tuning and Setup window as shown below.

Motortuning.JPG

In the column titled Axis Selection, press the button corresponding to the axis you want to set up. The selected axis’s parameters will be loaded. Now you can adjust your velocity setting as shown below.

 Motortuning2.JPG

Press [SAVE AXIS SETTINGS] before clicking on another axis or closing out the Motor Tuning and Setup window.

WARNING No limits have been set up.  DEATH, INJURY or serious PROPERTY DAMAGE can occur if the system is not operated carefully.

 

2.4    Backlash Calculation

The Apollo III has backlash compensation. Use the MDI line to enter G-Code to move the axes. To calculate the machine’s backlash, follow the steps below.

  1. Move an axis in one direction farther than the maximum possible backlash.
  2. Mount a dial indicator and zero it.
  3. Move the axis again in the same direction for a specific distance (it doesn’t matter how far).
  4. Move the axis backwards the same distance.
  5. Note how far the dial indicator was off from zero to see the axis’s backlash value.
  6. On the menu bar go to Config->Config Plugins and press the [CONFIG] button on the HiCON plugin line.
  7. Select the tab corresponding to the desired axis.
  8. Enter the backlash distance and speed as described below.

Backlashcomp.JPG

Backlash (mm, inch) – This field defines the backlash distance in inches or mm.  The Apollo III uses this value to calculate virtual load position.

Backlash Speed % – This field adjusts the maximum acceleration that the backlash counts can be applied. The Apollo III takes the max acceleration from the motor tuning and multiplies it by this percentage. Valid values are 10-400 (0.1 to 4 times max acceleration).  A common value is 20%.

WARNING Do not leave the backlash speed zero if you enter in a backlash distance. The Apollo III will not function.

 

2.5    Reversing Direction

If an axis moves the wrong direction, it can be reversed in the Mach3 software.

  1. Navigate to the menu bar and click Config->Homing/Limits.

The following window will come up:

DirectionMotors.JPG

  1. Under the Reversed column click on the red “X” if the axis needs to be reversed.
  2. After making all the changes, press [OK].

The axis will now move the opposite direction than it did before.

2.6    Slaving an Axis

To configure an axis as a slave, follow the steps outlined below.

  1. Ensure the slave axis motor settings (Steps per, velocity, acceleration) are matched to the master axis.
  2. Click Config->Slave Axis on the main menu bar. It will display the Slave Axis Selection.
  3. Select the axis to be slaved. The X, Y, and Z axes can have A, B, or C as slaves. For example, the configuration below is used to slave the A axis to the Y axis. Press [OK] once selections have been made.

Slaveaxis2.JPG

  1. Click Config -> General Config and ensure Home Slave with Master Axis is checked:
    • home slave with master axis

  2. In the Config -> Ports and Pins menu, select the Input Signals tab and ensure the limits and home signals are NOT enabled (red X):
    • NOTE: The master axis limit and home signals must be enabled and configured
  3. Once the above steps have been completed, close the Mach software, then restart it. Test the homing to ensure it moves the master and slave axis in coordinated movement (not opposing thus causing twisting/binding) and that it trips the master home switch and then comes back off of it and completes the homing sequence.

NOTE: In order to use homing to "square" the gantry a home switch for both the master and slave will be required, and it is the alignment/positing of these switches that will need to be adjusted to get the gantry square. To configure for this, setup the slave axis as indicated above and test to ensure proper functionality, then:

  • Uncheck the slave home with master box in general config
  • Enable and configure the slave axis home signal in ports and pins
  • Contact MachMotion Support to complete the following:
    • ensure the slave home with master in general config is NOT checked
    • ensure the slave axis Home signal is enabled and configured in ports and pins
    • uncheck use index pulse in HiCON plugin for master and slave axis
    • edit refall macro to NOT home the slave axis (If it has a refcombination, change to multi-axis homing)
      • DoOEMButton(1023) 'Ref Y
        DoOEMButton(1022) 'Ref X
        'DoOEMButton(1025) 'Ref A
        'DoOEMButton(1026) 'Ref B
        'DoOEMButton(1027) 'Ref C
    • The homing direction for the slave axis may need to change depending on system configuration. Here is example of a working setup, where the direction of each axis is different (X is reversed, A is not), but both of them are set to Home Negative. Typically, you need to set the slave axis signal for the Home Negative field to match what it is for the master.
    • close and restart Mach software. Test homing. Home switch needs to be adjusted to get proper gantry alignment.

3  Spindle Setup

This section goes through the wiring and configuration process for spindle integration with Mach3. The Apollo III spindle control consists of a 0-10V analog signal for spindle speed and two relays (CW and CCW) for spindle direction. Below the spindle terminals there are two LEDs for spindle forward (FWD) and reverse (REV).

spdleleds.JPG

3.1    Wiring a Spindle

3.1.1    VFD from MachMotion

The process for setting up a VFD from MachMotion is extremely simple. Simply plug the control cable into the Spindle Control RJ45 jack located on the bottom row of the large RJ45 block.

SpindleCTRLport.JPG

3.1.2    VFD Other Than from MachMotion

Any VFD can be wired into the Spindle Control RJ45 jack by cutting the end off of a CAT5 cable and wiring the loose ends to the VFD according the following pin out.

Function

Analog 0-10VDC

CW Relay

CW Relay

Drive Enable

GND

N/C

CCW Relay

CCW Relay

RJ45 Pins

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Colors

White & Orange

Orange

White & Green

Blue

White & Blue

Green

White & Brown

Brown

Table 3 Spindle Control RJ45 Jack

3.1.3    No VFD

If the system does not use a VFD to control the spindle, wire the spindle into the small green connecter as shown below. Notice that 24V is wired to the CW and CCW relay contacts on the top row of the green connector.

novfd.JPG

3.2    Spindle Configuration

3.2.1    Spindle Pulley Setup

For Mach3 to know how to scale the analog voltage output, the maximum RPM for the spindle motor must be defined. If the machine has different gears Mach3 can have multiple maximum speeds. Mach3 uses a different pulley for each different speed configuration.

For example, one pulley could be set to 75 to 300 RPM for a low speed (at 300 RPM the control will output 10V). A medium speed pulley could go from 300 to 1200 RPM and high speed pulley could run from 1200 to 2400 RMP.

To change the pulleys, go to Config->Spindle Pulleys. The Pulley Selection window will appear as shown in Figure 22.

pulleyrange.JPG

Use the drop down menu titled Current Pulley to select the pulley to be updated. Enter in the maximum and minimum speeds for each pulley. Then select the current pulley and press [OK].

Note: Only set up multiple pulleys if the machine has different gears.

Note: If the spindle is turning the wrong direction check the reversed box in the Spindle Pulleys window.

The pulleys can also be changed by using M41-M45. The macros can be used to just change pulleys in Mach3 or they can be used to automatically change gears on the machine. Outputs 12-16 are configured to shift between gears 1 and 5. To shift the machine into neutral, run M40. Open up the macros (M41-M45) with the VB Script Editor for more details.

3.3    Turning on the Spindle

To control the spindle use the following M-Codes with an S word for spindle RPM in the MDI line (Ex. M3 S2000).

M-Code

Function

M3

Clockwise

M4

Counter/Clockwise

M5

Stop

Table 4 Spindle M-Codes

If the spindle is not running correctly at this point some settings may need to change inside the VFD. In this situation reference the VFD manufacturer manual.

Note: See the Mitsubishi VFD Installation Guide for setup information if it was purchased from MachMotion.

3.4    Reversing Direction

To reverse a pulley’s direction, go to Config->Spindle Pulleys. Select the pulley that needs to be reversed and then check the small box called Reversed as shown below.

reversespindlerange.JPG

4  Limits and Homing Setup

The Apollo III motion controller has up to 16 inputs that can be used for the limit and home switches. To maximize the number of inputs available for other functions, wire multiple switches in series as shown below.

limitswitchesseriesNC.JPG

The standard limit input allocation is show below.

Axis

Input Number

Axis

Input Number

X

X1

A

X4

Y

X2

B

X5

Z

X3

C

X6

Table 5 Input Port and Pin Numbers

To set up and wire 24V limit/home switches, follow the steps outlined below.

  1. Pick two limit switches closest to the end of the axis’ maximum and minimum travel.
  2. Wire the two switches normally closed in series as shown in Figure 24.
  3. Wire the remaining side of the first switch to C0+ from the Apollo III motion controller.
  4. Wire the remaining side of the limit/home switch into the correct input (see Table 5) depending on which axis is being wired.
  5. On the menu bar at the top of the screen select Config->Ports and Pins.
  6. Click on the Input Signals tab (See Figure 25).
  7. Enable the limit and home switches by clicking the red [X] by the signal to make it a green check.

Note: Each axis has three signals the max travel (X++), the min travel (X--), and the home (X Home). All three must be enabled and set to the correct port and pin address for everything to work correctly using the wiring description above.

  1. Set the Port Number and Pin Number to the desired input. All input signals use port 11 and the pin number corresponds to the X number it is wired to (Ex. An input wired into X3 will have a port number of 11 and a pin number of 3).
  2. Set up the active low checkbox to a green check.

Note: Under the active low column the active state can be changed by clicking on the [X] or check mark. If the limit switches are normally open the red X mark should be used. However, this is not recommended as it is not as safe.

  1. When the limit and home switches are completely configured, press [Apply] and then [OK].

Inputsigs.JPG

For example, the configuration above has X, Y, and Z limit and home switches enabled. All of them are wired normally closed. The port and pin for X is port 11 pin 1 (X1) and for Y it is port 11 pin 2 (X2). Notice that all the limit switches and the home switch for an axis have the same port and pin numbers.

4.1    Homing Setup

Now the limit and homing switches are set up correctly it is time to finish setting up homing.

  1. Home each axis of the machine individually if possible. Note which axes home in the wrong direction.

Note: See the system operating manual for individual axis homing instructions.

WARNING If the limit switches are not set up correctly or if an axis moves in the opposite direction of the home switch, the machine could crash. Make sure to keep a hand on the Emergency Stop button the first time the machine homes.

...............................................................................................................................................

  1. Open to the menu bar and click Config->Homing/Limits. The Motor Home/Soft Limits window will come up as shown below.

softlim.JPG

If any of the axes homed in the wrong direction, click on the red X next to the axis on the Home Neg

  1. Set the speed of the axis by changing the percentage under the Speed % Press [OK] to close the Motor Home/Soft Limits window.

Homing on the machine should now be completely set up. Press the [Home All] button again to make sure that everything works correctly.

4.2    Soft Limits Setup

Soft limits are utilized to keep the machine from crashing. If the soft limits are set up correctly, the machine will never be able to hit a physical limit switch unless it is not homed properly. If at any time a command is made for the machine to move outside of the soft limits (while they are enabled), an error will appear in the status line or a window will pop up asking if the program should continue. To set up the soft limits, follow the procedure outlined below.

  1. Jog the machine to the maximum distance from the homing switches.

Note: Make sure to stay inside the physical limit switches. If the machine is jogged outside of the limit switches, it completely defeats the purpose of soft limits.

  1. Record the machine coordinates at the end of the travel.
  2. Open the menu bar and click Config->Homing/Limits to bring up the Motor Home/Soft Limits window will come up (See Figure 26).
  3. For each axis enter in the recorded values.

Note: If the value is positive, place it into the Soft Max limit and set the Soft Min limit to zero. Otherwise, with a negative value, set the Soft Max to zero and the Soft Min to the recorded value.

  1. Press [OK].

softlim2.JPG

  1. Enable the soft limits (See the Operating Manual for more detail).

Note: Soft limits prevent the machine from being able to jog outside of the acceptable range. Also when starting a G-Code file it will warn the operator if the file will go outside of the limits. However, if the warning is ignored it will not prevent a G-Code file from overrunning them.

Test the soft limits by jogging the axes in all directions. As long as the machine is homed, it will never be able to hit a hard limit switch.

5  Input Setup

5.1    Generic Inputs

All 16 inputs on the Apollo III can be used for limit switches, home switches, tool changers, or anything else. To learn how to set up limit switches, go to Setting up Limits and Homing in section 4. As shown below, the inputs are located on the main green terminal block.

jumpers.JPG

Note: Some of the input terminals and jumpers are not used for the Apollo I.

 

Each input has an LED that shows the current state of the input. Both the LED and input are labeled with the input name. The inputs run from X0, up to X15. If the LED is on, then the input is activated. Different configurations can be selected for each input by using the jumpers near the bottom right of Apollo III. Each jumper corresponds to an input. For example, the jumper labeled X10 corresponds to the input on TB1 labeled X10 and the LED X10.

inputsjumpers.JPG

WARNING Input X0 is configured as drive fault by default. If you have servo drives from MachMotion, DO NOT connect anything to X0. It could damage your drives or Apollo III motion controller.

 

5.2    Wiring Inputs

5.2.1    Standard 24V Inputs

For a standard 24V input, place the jumper on the bottom two pins. In the example below, all the inputs are set up as standard 24V inputs. Next, connect C0+ to 24V and C0- to GND on TB1 as shown below.

Inputs24v.JPG

 

Then connect the input to the input terminal on the middle row (X1, X2, etc.). See the diagram below.

inputs24vstandard.JPG

To activate the input, 24V must be supplied to the input. A floating signal or a ground will not turn on the input. The LED corresponding to the input will turn on brightly when the input is activated.

5.2.2    Sinking Inputs (NPN)

For most NPN proxys place the jumper on the top two pins. Then connect the signal into the corresponding input. See the example below.

 inputsNPN.JPG

If the proxy has an internal pull-up resistor, depending on its size, it could require the jumper to be completely removed. Use a 3.9k ohm resistor and connect it between XSL and C0+.

Below is an example of a 24V NPN proxy with an internal pull-up resistor. The jumper on the Apollo III must be completely removed for this to work.

 inputs3.1.JPG

 

5.2.3    Sourcing Inputs (PNP)

For PNP proxies place the jumper on the bottom two pins. Then connect the signal into the corresponding input. See the example below.

Inputs3.JPG

5.3    Configuring Inputs

To configure an input, follow the procedure below.

  1. On the menu bar click on Config->Ports and Pins.
  2. Select the Input Signals Scroll down to the desired input. There are 4 inputs and 15 OEM triggers. An OEM trigger acts exactly like an input.

xlJfig36portsandpins.JPG

 

  1. Enable the input by clicking on the red “X”. If it is a green check mark, it is already enabled.
  2. Set the Port Number and Pin Number to the desired input.

Note: All input port numbers are 11 and the pin numbers correspond to the X number

(X4 would be pin 4)

  1. To change when the input is active, click on the Active Low A green check mark means that the input is active low and a red X means that the input is active high.

The input is now be set up.

6  Output Setup

6.1    Generic Outputs

The Apollo III has 8 logic outputs that can be used for any low current application. They are located on the small green terminal block as shown below.

Fig37Genericoutputs.JPG

Each output has an LED that shows its current state. The outputs and LEDs are labeled Y0 through Y7. If the LED is on, the output is activated.

6.2    Wiring Outputs

There are two separate commons for the outputs. The common C1+ is for outputs Y0-Y3 and C2+ is for Y4-Y7. Each common can take 7-48VDC. If the outputs being used are using the voltage supply from Apollo III, each output can only supply 125mA. However, if they are supplied using a separate voltage source, each output can source up to 250mA.

For standard operation the outputs can have their commons jumpered to 24V on the Apollo III. At that point simply connect the load between the output and GND. See the figure below.

outputs1.JPG

 

6.3    Configuring Outputs

To configure an output, follow the procedure below.

  1. On the menu bar click on Config->Ports and Pins.
  2. Select the Output Signals
  3. Scroll down to the desired output (There are 20 outputs that can be used).

outputconfig.JPG

Note: The note below the output signal window is referencing parallel port systems. Ignore this.

  1. Enable the output by setting the Enabled box to a green check.
  2. Set the Port Number to 11 and the Pin Number to the corresponding Y number (Y3 would be pin number 3).
  3. Set the Active Low column to a green check for a normally closed signal or red x for normally open.

6.4    Using Outputs

Outputs 5-10 can be controlled with M-Codes. One M-Code turns an output on, and the other M-Code turns the output off. Use the table below for a reference.

Custom M-Codes

Functions

Default Output

M200

Output 5 on

Y2

M201

Output 5 off

M202

Output 6 on

Y3

M203

Output 6 off

M204

Output 7 on

Y4

M205

Output 7 off

M206

Output 8 on

Y5

M207

Output 8 off

M208

Output 9 on

Y6

M209

Output 9 off

M210

Output 10 on

Y7

M211

Output 10 off

 

The outputs can also be accessed inside the MachMotion plugin. Read  Mist and Flood Control

Advanced Options in section 7 for more information on how to use outputs inside the plugin.

6.5    Mist and Flood Control

Mist is already preconfigured in Mach3 to be wired into Y0 on the small green connector.

Feature

ON M-Code

OFF M-Code

Preconfigured Output

Mist

M7

M9

Output 3 - Y0

Flood

M8

Output 4 - Y1

 

7  Advanced Options

A number of advanced features can be accessed and configured in the MachMotion plugin such as periodic oiler control and custom user messages. Begin by going to PlugIn Control->MachMotion Config to open the MachMotion plugin.iooutput.JPG

In general, only change values and settings in the red boxes shown above. The rest of the options are used to set up the control at the factory. Please do not change these settings.

The I/O Configuration section allows an input to turn on a function. The input in the drop down menu turns on the corresponding function. In the figure above, OEM trigger 1 (OEMTRIGGER1) turns on the drive fault.

For example, to set up an external E-Stop, configure a normal input in ports and pins (See Setting up Inputs). Let’s assume we set up Input 4. Then use the drop down menu in the System Configuration window to select the input as shown below.

The system may also require an oiler. Just define an output, set the time run time of the oiler, and the time between cycles. In the example below the oiler is attached to output 6. It is turned on for 10 seconds every 1 minute. The spindle has to be on for the oiler to turn on.

Oiler.JPG

cyclestart.JPG

Now whenever Input4 is active, E-Stop will be flagged.

MMuser.JPG

The User Messages can be configured to have custom messages displayed. Each input will do a specific function (E-Stop, feed hold, stop) and write to the status bar except the No Action option. The No Action just displays the message on the status bar whenever the input is active. In the example below, when OEM trigger 4 is activated, the message “MCR Reset!” will be displayed on the status bar.

Usermessages.JPG

8  Advanced Setup

8.1    Apollo III Network Connection

The Apollo III can be connected directly to the control or via an Ethernet router. Either of the two Ethernet ports on the Apollo III can be used. The Ethernet ports have a built in Ethernet switch so you can also use them to daisy chain other Ethernet devices together on a local network.

ethernetports.JPG

8.1.1    Direct Connection

To set up the Apollo III to communicate with the control directly, the network configuration needs to be assigned a static IP address. The default static IP configuration is defined below.

directnetwork.JPG

8.1.1.1    Configuring a Static IP Address on Windows 7

  1. Click on the network icon on the system tray.

systemtray.JPG

  1. Click on Open Network and Sharing Center.
  2. In the top left corner of the Network and Sharing Center window click on Change adapter settings.
  3. Right click on the network port that the Apollo III is connected to and select
  4. From the list below double click on Internet Protocol Version 4.

localarea.JPG

  1. Fill out the options as seen below.

IPV4Image2.JPG

  1. Press [OK] and close out the rest of the windows.

The control now has the correct static IP address.

8.1.2    Router Connection

When using a network router to connect the Apollo III to the control there is no special network setup required. The router will take care of the IP assignments.

routerconnection.JPG

8.2    Apollo III Software Installation

8.2.1    Installing Apollo III Plugin and Firmware

The plugin and firmware manage the communication and operation of the Apollo III.

Once the files are downloaded on the control, put them in the locations specified below.

firmware.JPG

Note: If the file location for the firmware does not exist, create the folders.

8.2.2    Installing VSI Manager

The VSI manager interfaces with the Apollo III motion controller for updating firmware and managing the connection. To install the manager go to the Downloads page at MachMotion.com. Run the installation program using the default options.

To download the firmware to the Apollo III, follow the procedure below:

  1. Open the VSI Device Manager
  2. Click on the [Scan Network]

vsiscreen.JPG

Note: A device should be listed as shown.

  1. Select the device and press [Switch To Loader].
  2. Click through the message windows that pop up and click on [Load File].
  3. Select the .bin file from the location specified in Error! Reference source not found..
  4. Press [Program Flash] and wait until it finishes programming.
  5. Press [OK] when it asks to reboot to launch the new firmware.
  6. Close the device manager.

The firmware should now be updated.

WARNING Install the plugin AND download the firmware to the Apollo III. If the firmware and plugin versions do not match, it could cause serious damage to the machine or cause the Apollo III not to operate at all.

 

8.3    Mach3 Integration

8.3.1    Mach3 Startup

Open up the Mach3 software, making sure to select the correct profile. Select the M3HiCON plugin as shown below. Make sure to select Don’t ask me this again.

deviceplugin.JPG

After Mach3 has completely loaded, the status bar at the bottom of the screen should say “HiCON Online. Plugin: X.XX, Board: XXXX / X.XX, FPGA: XXXX” where the Xs represent the version numbers. If this message comes up, then everything is connected correctly.

If the status bar in Mach3 says “HiCON Board Not Found,” then check the Ethernet cable’s connection and the control’s IP configuration. If Mach3 continually pops up with errors, make sure that the correct firmware (that matches the current plugin) is downloaded in the Apollo III.

8.4    Apollo III Status Window

To view the status of the Apollo III from inside Mach3, click on PlugIn Control on the top menu bar and then select HiCON Status.

The HiCON Status window shows the current state of the encoders, the inputs, and the outputs.

hiconstatus.JPG

The outputs can be toggled by clicking on the output LEDs.  If an output is defined inside Mach3 under Ports and Pins, then clicking on the output LED will have no effect. This window can be left open while running Mach3.

The P stands for the port number. So output Y0 is port 11 pin 0 located at P11 column 0.

Note: The HiCON Status window is a great place to check for encoder feedback.

8.5    Apollo III Configuration

To change anything inside the controller, the HiCON plugin must be used. Click Config on the main menu bar, then Config PlugIns. Select the yellow CONFIG button next to the M3HiCON-www.VSI99.com-HICON-X.XX plugin as shown below.

hiconplugin.JPG

Once the HiCON plugin config is launched, a window with the following seven tabs will appear:

  1. System
  2. Axis X(0)
  3. Axis Y(1)
  4. Axis Z(2)
  5. Axis A(3)
  6. Axis B(4)
  7. Axis C(5)

Each axis tab besides the System tab represents an axis to be controlled through the Apollo III.  By default, the System tab will be selected as shown below.

hiconconfig.JPG

At any time while inside the plugin, clicking on the [UPDATE HICON] button will transmit the settings to the Apollo III motion controller.  Clicking [OK] will also transmit the settings to the controller and save them in the selected Mach3 profile (e.g. Mach3Mill, Mach3Turn, etc).

To exit the plugin, press [OK] and then [OK] again on the PlugIn Control and Activation window.

Now, with a brief overview of the Apollo III, it is time to start configuring the controller.

9  Enable Circuit

The Apollo III has a hardware enable and a drive enable circuit. However, before they will work, the emergency stop circuit must be set up. Use the table below as a quick reference for the different signals.

enablecircuts.JPG

WARNING Do NOT connect 115VAC to any part of the Apollo III motion controller. It could cause serious damage to the controller.

9.1    Emergency Stop

The emergency stop connector is located right below the power connector on the Apollo III. When the emergency stop terminals are connected together, the red E-Stop LED turns on and the controller can then enable.

 zowestop.JPG

Note: Nothing will work on the Apollo III motion controller unless the Emergency Stop terminals are connected together!

Emergency stop input is set up inside Mach3 by setting the E-Stop signal to port 14 pin 5. When it is set up correctly, any time the emergency stop terminals are disconnected, Mach3 will be reset.

Mach3estopsetup.JPG

9.2    Hardware Enable

The hardware enable is the main enable circuit. It enables all the components on the Apollo III, turns on the 5V enable (5EN) and the 24V enable signals (24EN), and activates the hardware enable relay (HEN). When the hardware enable is set up correctly, it will only activate when there are no emergency conditions. Tripping the emergency circuit or a limit switch will disable the hardware enable. Remember that the emergency stop terminals must be connected for anything to enable.

The 5V and 24V enable signals can be used for any low current applications. The hardware enable relay can be used for higher current applications up to 48V if an external voltage source is provided. The signals are labeled 5EN, 24EN, and HEN on the Apollo III terminal block TB2 as shown below.

hardwareenable.JPG

View the diagram below for an example of the hardware enable relay wiring.

HENrelay.JPG

The green LED (labeled Enable) turns on as soon as the controller detects the enable signal from Mach3. The LED does not mean that the hardware enable circuit is activated. The hardware enable circuit is only activated when the red (E-Stop), orange (Power), and green (Enable) LEDs are on.

HENled.JPG

Hardware enable is set up inside Mach3 by setting one of the Enables to port 14 pin 0. Each enable signal corresponds to an axis (Enable1 = X, Enable2 = Y, etc). Make sure that the axis corresponding to the enable signal used is enabled under the Motor Outputs tab. For example, a lathe with only the X and Z axes enabled should not use the Enable2 (Y axis enable) signal.  

 

enablesetup.JPG

9.3    Drive Enable

Drive enable is used to enable all the drives. When activated the drive enable relay connects the external enable (EXT) to the servo enable (SOV) terminals on TB2.  The signal SOV runs to each axis control RJ45 jack. EXT can be jumpered to 5V, 24V, GND, or any other DC voltage up to 48V for different enable signals depending on what the servo drives require. Again, remember that the emergency stop terminals must be connected for anything to enable.

driveenable.JPG

The Mitsubishi, Yaskawa, and TECO servo drives from MachMotion are all enabled with a ground signal. Therefore EXT and GND are connected together as shown below.

Driveenableexample.JPG

The blue LED (labeled Drive Enable) on the top middle of the controller turns on as soon as the drive enable signal from Mach3 is detected. The blue LED does not mean that the drive enable relay is activated. The drive enable relay is only activated when the red (E-Stop), green (Enable), and blue (Drive Enable) LEDs are on.

driveenableled.JPG

If the system needs to use the drive enable signal without using the axis control cables, just connect the signal directly to SOV.

Drive enable is set up inside Mach3 by setting one of the Enables to port 14 pin 1. Each enable signal corresponds to an axis (Enable1 = X, Enable2 = Y, etc). Make sure that the axis corresponding to the enable signal used is enabled under the Motor Outputs tab. For example, a lathe with only the X and Z axes enabled should not use the Enable2 (Y axis enable) signal. 

mach3driveenablesetup.JPG

Now with the enable circuits set up, the next step is to set up the machine axes.

10  Axes

To set up the axes, the drives must be connected to the controller, the Apollo III controller must be configured, and the Mach3 software must be set up as defined below.

10.1   Connecting Drives

The Apollo III motion controller uses step and direction to control the axes. It can use differential or single-ended outputs. For differential outputs there are two signals for step (step + and step -) and two signals for direction (direction + and direction -). For single-ended there is only one signal for both step and direction. All MachMotion products use differential outputs.

10.1.1 Differential Control

Most systems use differential step and direction. The step and direction outputs are located on the bottom row of RJ1, the large RJ45 jack block. See the diagram below.

Screenshot_1.jpg

 The pinout for the RJ45 jacks is shown below.

Function

Reserved

Drive Error

Direction +

Drive Enable

GND

Direction -

Step +

Step -

RJ45 Pins

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Colors

White & Orange

Orange

White & Green

Blue

White & Blue

Green

White & Brown

Brown

Table 11 Axis Control RJ45 Jack Pinouts

Any drive from MachMotion can be plugged directly into the axis control RJ45 jacks.

10.1.2 Single-Ended Control

To use single-ended control use the terminals on TB1 (the large green terminal block). The top row is for the direction signals and the middle row is for the step signals. The first letter on each terminal is the axis name and the second letter is the function (D for direction and S for step). See the picture below.

 

Screenshot_2.jpg

With the drives connected it is time to connect the encoder feedback. Skip the next section if the system does not have encoder feedback or if it is not going to be set up at this time.

10.1.3 Encoder Feedback

The encoder feedback inputs are located on the top of RJ1. The encoder signal for each axis is directly above the control signal. See the diagram below.

figure67encoderfeedback.jpg

 

The Apollo III uses a 5V encoder signal. See the pinout below.

Function

A+

A-

B+

5V

GND

B-

I+

I-

RJ45 Pins

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Colors

White & Orange

Orange

White & Green

Blue

White & Blue

Green

White & Brown

Brown

Table 12 Encoder Feedback RJ45 Jack Pinout

Again any drives purchased from MachMotion can have their encoder feedback plugged directly into the encoder RJ45 jacks.

10.2   Configuring Axes

The axes must also be configured inside the HiCON plugin. Begin by opening up the plugin. Select the tab corresponding to the axis to be configured.

Screenshot_3.jpg

The control parameters are used to configure the axes. If the Apollo III came with a MachMotion control all of the following parameters will already be set up. For all other systems, the only parameter that should have to change is the Feedback. If the system has encoder feedback, make sure to select the correct encoder under the Feedback drop down bar. The encoder index starts at 0. So for the X axis use Encoder0, for the Y axis Encoder1.

The default parameters are shown below:

Parameter Name

Value

Source

MACHxx

Index

N*

Gain

1

Output

StepGenN*

Feedback

EncoderN*

Max Follow Error

10000

Table 13 Control Parameters

*N is the axis number with 0 being X, 1 being Y, 2 being Z, etc.

To update the control parameters, press the UPDATE HICON button.  Clicking on OK or the SAVE CONFIGURATION buttons saves the entire configuration to the selected Mach3 profile.

The axes should now be set up enough to jog the machine.


WARNING The machine has not been calibrated so it could jog at extremely high speeds and move erroneous distances. Also, no limits have been set up so DEATH, INJURY or serious PROPERTY DAMAGE could result if extreme caution is not used.

If more information is desired about the control parameters, please read the section below.

10.2.1 Control Parameters

Source Source defines the input type for the controller for a particular axis.  This should be set to MACHxx.  If the axis is not used, it must be disabled by selecting Undefined.

Index – Index defines the index of the controller source.  This is equal to the axis number (X = 0, Y = 1, Z = 2, etc). 

Gain – The control input (commanded) is multiplied by this number. Leave this at 1 for most applications.

Output –  Output defines the output for the controller for a particular axis.  The possible values are:

StepGenX: This setting uses step and direction as the output. X refers to the axis number.

Undefined: This setting is used to disable the axis and to ignore the control output index.  If the axis is not enabled, then the Output must be set to Undefined.

Feedback – Feedback defines the feedback type for the controller for the selected axis.  The possible values are:

Encoder: Use one of the differential hardware encoder inputs 0…7 as the feedback.

None: Use this if the system is not going to use encoder feedback.

Homing Type – Defines the homing sequence for each axis.  Two types of homing sequences are supported:

Home Sensor(Homing with or without an Index Pulse)
The axis moves in the configured direction until a home sensor is seen.  It then moves in the opposite direction at 20% of initial speed until the sensor is not seen. If Use Index Pulse is checked, then the axis will continue moving until it finds the index pulse.  At this point the home position is defined. 

IndexPulseOnly: (Use only the Index pulse to Home)

The axis moves in the configured direction to locate the index pulse to home the axis.  As soon as the index pulse is detected, it clears the position counter to indicate the home position and stops the axis.

Max Follow Error – Defines the number of steps between the commanded position and the actual position (from the encoder feedback) before an emergency condition is triggered. This value is only applicable if the system is using encoder feedback.

10.3   Testing Motion

The test motion module is only useful if encoder feedback is being used. For most applications this will never be needed. However, this can be used to optimize the system acceleration and velocity. It allows the following error of the machine to be viewed during commanded movements. Utilize the figure below as a reference.

Screenshot_5.jpg

Follow the steps below to test motion.

  1. Enter in the desired axis velocity in units per minute
  2. Enter in the desired acceleration value for the machine
  3. Select the Relative or Absolute option

Note: Relative moves the machine X distance from its current position. Absolute moves the machine to the machine coordinate position (distance from home). Relative is generally recommended.

  1. Enter the distance in the Position user input.
  2. Press the button DRIVE ON to turn on the LED beneath the button. This enables the drives. When the LED is green, the drives are enabled.

Note: To download a new configuration to the Apollo III, DRIVE ON must be disabled.

  1. Press EXECUTE to command the movement

The axis can also be homed by pressing the HOME button. Make sure that homing is set up in Mach3 before using this function.

By selecting the AutoReverse check box, the system can make the axis reverse direction automatically for the next motion command and thus avoid the axis continuing on in one direction during testing.  The Ready LED shows if the Apollo III is ready to accept a motion command.  If the Ready LED is green, it implies that the controller is ready to accept new motion commands.  While executing a motion profile, the Ready LED turns to red and Apollo III cannot accept a new motion command until the current motion sequence is completed or cancelled.

Once the test motion command has completed, the accuracy of the commanded motion profile can be seen on the on the Motor/Drive Response graph.  The acceleration and velocity can be optimized to get the machine’s following error to a minimum.

Screenshot_6.jpg

The blue line represents the actual position, the red line shows the commanded position, and the green line displays the actual speed. Therefore the distance between the blue line and the red line is the following error.

Below is a review of all the test motion parameters. Read this section for more information.

10.3.1 Test Motion Parameters

Position – Test motion final position or displacement in terms of Position Units, e.g. 1.5, 10.093, mm or inches etc.

Acceleration – Test motion acceleration value in terms of Units per second squared, e.g. inches/second2, mm/sec2 etc.

Velocity – Test motion velocity value in terms of Units per minute, e.g. inches/minute, mm/minute etc.

Relative and Absolute – These check boxes indicate whether the value in the Position field is the distance to travel (relative) or the final position (absolute).

Execute Button – Transmits Execute Motion command to Apollo III.  In addition, it also downloads control parameters before starting the motion.  User can press the CANCEL button to cancel the motion execution anytime during the machine operation.   Make sure that the axis control settings have been downloaded by clicking UPDATE HICON before clicking on EXECUTE.  Motion commands can be run by pressing the EXECUTE button when the Ready LED is green.

DRIVE ON Button – By clicking this button, the plugin downloads the parameters and enables the drives.  If DRIVE ON is active, the LED below this button will turn to green. Otherwise it will be red.

HOME Button – Executes the homing sequence based on selected homing settings.

Reverse - Checking this option will multiply the parameter in the position box with -1 and thus the direction of motion will be reversed.

Auto Reverse -  Checking the auto reverse option will toggle the “reverse” option between two consecutive motion commands, thus the user does not have to manually reverse the direction of the motion every time.

Axis Position Display (DRO) – Shows the position of the axis based on the different settings as described below:

Show units - When this option is selected, the data shown will be converted and shown in units (mm, inches etc), otherwise data will be displayed in raw encoder counts.

Screenshot_7.jpg

Commanded position - Displays the value of the internal variable for the commanded position for the selected axis.

Load Encoder - Displays the axis position derived from backlash count and selected feedback encoder.

Motor Encoder – Displays the current value of the axis position derived only from the encoder feedback.

10.4   Backlash Compensation

The Apollo III has backlash compensation. Each axis tab in the HiCON plugin has the fields below for controlling the compensation amount and speed.

Screenshot_8.jpg

Backlash (mm,inch) – This field defines the backlash distance in inches or mm.  The Apollo III uses this value to calculate virtual load position.

Backlash Speed % – This field adjusts the maximum acceleration that the backlash counts can be applied. The Apollo III takes the max acceleration from the motor tuning and multiplies it by this percentage. Valid values are 10-400 (0.1 to 4 times max acceleration).

WARNING Do not use the native backlash compensation in Mach3. The backlash compensation in the HiCON plugin is the master and the Mach3 settings are ignored.

10.5   Reversing Direction

If an axis moves the wrong direction, it can be reversed in the Mach3 software.

  1. Navigate to the menu bar and click Config->Homing/Limits.

The following window will come up:

Screenshot_9.jpg

  1. Under the Reversed column click on the red “X” if the axis needs to be reversed
  2. After making all the changes, press OK
  3. On the menu bar go to Config->Config Plugins and press the CONFIG button on the HiCON plugin line
  4. Change the Encoder Polarity all axes reversed above from Positive to Negative or vice versa

Screenshot_10.jpg

The axis will now move the opposite direction than it did before. If the polarity is not changed a following error will occur every time that axis is commanded to move.

10.6   Slaving an Axis

To configure an axis as a slave, follow the steps outlined below.

  1. Click Config->Slave Axis on the main menu bar. It will display the Slave Axis Selection window

Screenshot_11.jpg

  1. Select the axis to be slaved. The X, Y, and Z aces can have A, B, or C as slaves. For example, the configuration below is used to slave the A axis to the Y axis

Screenshot_12.jpg

  1. Press OK and then restart Mach3
  2. On the menu bar go to Config->Config Plugins and press the CONFIG button on the HiCON plugin line
  3. Go to the tab for the slave axis and set the Index drop down to match the number of the master axis (Ex. To slave A to X set Index on the A tab to 0)

Screenshot_13.jpg

  1. Press the [Save Config] button just to the lower right of the Control Input box

Note: Make sure to press the [Save Configuration] button after making any setting changes in the HiCON plugin.

11  Spindle

This section goes through the wiring and configuration process for spindle integration with Mach3. The Apollo III spindle control consists of a 0-10V analog signal for spindle speed and two relays (CW and CCW) for spindle direction. Below the spindle terminals there are two LEDs for spindle forward (FWD) and reverse (REV). If these LEDs turn on correctly, then the spindle is set up.

Screenshot_14.jpg

11.1   Wiring a Spindle

11.1.1  VFD

Any VFD can be wired into the Spindle Control RJ45 jack by cutting the end off of a CAT5 cable and wiring the loose ends to the VFD according the following pin out.

Function

Analog 0-10VDC

CW Relay

CW Relay

Drive Enable

GND

N/C

CCW Relay

CCW Relay

RJ45 Pins

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Colors

White & Orange

Orange

White & Green

Blue

White & Blue

Green

White & Brown

Brown

Table 14 Spindle Control RJ45 Jack

11.1.2 VFD from MachMotion

The process for setting up a VFD from MachMotion is extremely simple. Simply plug the control cable into the Spindle Control RJ45 jack located on the bottom row of the large RJ45 jack block.

Screenshot_15.jpg

11.1.3 No VFD

If the system does not use a VFD to control the spindle, wire the spindle into the small green connecter as shown below. Notice that 24V is wired to the CW and CCW relay contacts on the top row of the green connector.

Screenshot_16.jpg

11.1.4 Spindle Feedback

The Apollo III takes a 5V encoder signal as spindle feedback. Connect it into the top row of RJ1 as shown below.

Screenshot_17.jpg

The pin out for the spindle feedback RJ45 jack is shown below.

Function

A+

A-

B+

5V

GND

B-

I+

I-

RJ45 Pins

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Colors

White & Orange

Orange

White & Green

Blue

White & Blue

Green

White & Brown

Brown

Table 15 Spindle Feedback RJ45 Jack

11.2   Configuring the Spindle

11.2.1 Enabling the Spindle

Follow the directions below to enable the spindle inside Mach3.

  1. Select Config->Ports and Pins and then click on the Motor Outputs tab
  2. Enable all the spindle by setting the spindle box in the column titled Enable to a green check

All the port and pin numbers should be set to 0.

Screenshot_18.jpg

  1. Now click on the Output Signals tab
  2. Enable outputs 1 and 2 and set them up to port 14 pin 6 and port 14 pin 7 respectively as shown below. Make sure that the Active Low column is set to a red “X” for both outputs.

Screenshot_19.jpg

  1. Finally, click on the Spindle Setup

Description

Setting

Disable Spindle Relays

Unchecked

Clockwise (M3) Output #

1

CCW (M4) Output #

2

Use Spindle Motor Output

Checked

PWM Control

Checked

Step/Dir Motor

Unchecked

PWM Base Freq.

100

Minimum PWM

1

Table 16 Spindle Settings

Screenshot_20.jpg

  1. Press APPLY to save the changes and then OK.

The spindle is now enabled.

11.2.2 Spindle Pulley Setup

For Mach3 to know how to scale the analog voltage output, the maximum RPM for the spindle motor must be defined. If the machine has different gears Mach3 can have multiple maximum speeds. Mach3 uses a different pulley for each different speed configuration.

For example, one pulley could be set to 75 to 300 RPM for a low speed (at 300 RPM the control will output 10V). A medium speed pulley could go from 300 to 1200 RPM and high speed pulley could run from 1200 to 2400 RPM.

To change the pulleys, go to Config->Spindle Pulleys. The Pulley Selection window will appear as shown in Figure 22.

Screenshot_21.jpg

Use the drop down menu titled Current Pulley to select the pulley to be updated. Enter in the maximum and minimum speeds for each pulley. Then select the current pulley and press OK.

Note: Only set up multiple pulleys if the machine has different gears.

Note: If the spindle is turning the wrong direction check the reversed box in the Spindle Pulleys window

The pulleys can also be changed by using M41-M45. The macros can be used to just change pulleys in Mach3 or they can be used to automatically change gears on the machine. Outputs 12-16 are configured to shift between gears 1 and 5. To shift the machine into neutral, run M40. Open up the macros with the VB Script Editor for more details.

11.2.3 Analog Calibration

On the Systems tab the spindle voltage can be adjusted by changing the percentage (10-200%). Most systems will not require this value to be changed. However, if the voltage is not close enough, the percentage adjustment can be calculated with the following formula:

Analog Spindle Scale % = Commanded Voltage/Actual Voltage*100

Screenshot_22.jpg

11.2.4 RPM Feedback

If the spindle has encoder feedback, set up the Threading section. Set the RPM Sync to Hard Encoder, the RPM Sync Index to 6, and the RPM to the number of encoder pulses per revolution.

Screenshot_26.jpg

11.2.5 Servo Spindle Setup

To use a servo axis as a spindle the HiCON plugin will need to be configured as follows:

lm3Screenshot_25.jpg

Set the Spindle Axis drop down to the axis the servo spindle is connected to and set the Spindle Type to Gcode Axis.

11.2.6 Turning on the Spindle

In addition to the screen controls the spindle can also be controlled using M-codes. Use the table below as a reference.

M-Code

Function

M3

Clockwise

M4

Counter/Clockwise

M5

Stop


          Table 17 Spindle M-Codes

12  MPGs

The Apollo III has two 5V MPG encoder inputs. They are located on RJ1 as shown below.

Screenshot_27.jpg

Below is the pinout for the MPGs:Figure 88 MPG RJ45 Jacks

Function

A+

A-

B+

5V

GND

B-

N/C

N/C

RJ45 Pins

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Colors

White & Orange

Orange

White & Green

Blue

White & Blue

Green

White & Brown

Brown

Table 18 MPG RJ45 Jacks

To configure the MPGs open up the HiCON plugin as shown in the below image. Under the System tab set the MPG type to Encoder Channel. The Index should be set to 7 for MPG 1 and 8 for MPG 2 as shown below.

Screenshot_28.jpg

Next, set up the Mach3 software.

  1. Open up Config->Ports and Pins and go to the Encoder/MPG’s
  2. Enable one of the MPGs by clicking on the red X under the Enabled column. If it has a green check mark then it is already enabled.

Screenshot_29.jpg

  1. Set the Counts/Unit to the number of counts per click. On most MPGs this is 4.
  2. Press APPLY and then OK.

The MPG is now set up.

13  Inputs

The Apollo III has 16 configurable inputs. These inputs can be used for limit switches, home switches, tool changers, or anything else. As shown below, the inputs are located on the main green terminal block, TB1.

Screenshot_30.jpg

Each input has an LED that shows the current state of the input. Both the LED and input are labeled with the input name. The inputs start counting from X0 and up to X15. If the LED is on, then the input is activated. Different configurations can be selected for each input by using the jumpers near the bottom right of Apollo III. The jumpers start counting from the left at X0 and increment up to X15. Each jumper corresponds to an input. For example, the jumper labeled X10 corresponds to the input on TB1 labeled X10 and the LED X10.

Screenshot_31.jpg


WARNING Input X0 is configured as drive fault by default. If you servo drives from MachMotion, DO NOT connect anything to X0. It could damage your drives or Apollo III motion controller.

13.1   Wiring Inputs

13.1.1 Standard 24V Inputs

For a standard 24V input, place the jumper on the bottom two pins. Next, connect C0+ to 24V and C0- to GND on TB1 as shown below.

Screenshot_32.jpg

Then connect the input to the input terminal on the middle row (X1, X2, etc.). See the diagram below.

Screenshot_33.jpg

To activate the input, 24V must be supplied to the input. A floating signal or a ground will not turn on the input. The LED corresponding to the input will turn on brightly when the input is activated.

13.1.2 High Voltage Sourcing Inputs (PNP)

For 9-48V inputs, supply the positive voltage to the C0+ terminal and connect ground to C0-. Set the jumper for the input to the bottom two terminals. Then connect the signal into the corresponding input.

For example, the Apollo III shown below is set up for 30V. Notice that input X4 is connected to a switch.

Screenshot_34.jpg

Note: All the inputs use the same common.

Below is another example with a 12V PNP proxy sensor.

Screenshot_35.jpg

Figure 97 - 12V Proxy Example

13.1.3 Low Voltage Sourcing Inputs (PNP)

For 2.5-10V inputs, connect the positive voltage to the C0+ terminal and ground to C0-. Completely remove the jumper corresponding to the input and connect XNL (where N represents the input number) to GND. Then connect the signal to the corresponding input.

Assuming that the jumper for X5 has been removed, the example below shows how to wire in a 5V toggle switch.

 

Screenshot_36.jpg

Note: The 5V supply could come from TB2 on the Apollo III.

13.1.4 Sinking Inputs (NPN)

For most NPN proxies place the jumper on the top two pins. Then connect the signal into the corresponding input. See the example below.

 

Screenshot_37.jpg

If the proxy has an internal pull-up resistor, depending on its size, it could require the jumper to be completely removed. Use a 3.9k ohm resistor and connect it between XSL and C0+.

Below is an example of a 24V NPN proxy with an internal pull-up resistor. The jumper on the Apollo III must be completely removed for this to work.

Screenshot_38.jpg

13.1.5  Isolated Inputs

To isolate inputs, supply an external power supply to C0- (GND) and C0+ (positive voltage supply). Do not power the C0+ with more than 48V. All the other wiring configurations (PNP, NPN, etc) are the same whether or not the inputs are isolated. In the example below the inputs are isolated using a separate 5V power supply.

Screenshot_39.jpg

13.2   Configuring Inputs

To configure an input in Mach3, follow the procedure below.

  1. On the menu bar click on Config->Ports and Pins.
  2. Select the Input Signals Scroll down to the desired input. There are 4 inputs and 15 OEM triggers. An OEM trigger acts exactly like an input.

Screenshot_40.jpg

  1. Enable the input by clicking on the red “X”. If it is a green check mark, it is already enabled.
  2. Set the Port Number and Pin Number to the desired input

Note: All input port numbers are 11 and the pin numbers correspond to the X number (X4 would be pin 4)

  1. To change when the input is active, click on the Active Low A green check mark means that the input is active low and a red X means that the input is active high.

The input is now be set up.

14  Outputs

The Apollo III has 8 logic outputs that can be used for any low DC current application. They are located on the small green terminal block as shown below.

Screenshot_41.jpg

Each output has an LED that shows its current state. The outputs and LEDs are labeled Y0 through Y7. If the LED is on, the output is activated.

14.1   Wiring Outputs

There are two separate commons for the outputs. The common C1+ is for outputs Y0-Y3 and C2+ is for Y4-Y7. Each common can take 7-48VDC. If the outputs being used are using the voltage supply from Apollo III, each output can only supply 125mA. However, if they are supplied using a separate voltage source, each output can source up to 250mA.

For standard operation the outputs can have their commons jumpered to 24V on the Apollo III. At that point simply connect the load to the output and GND. See the figure below.

Screenshot_42.jpg

In the example below, a 10V and 48V supply are used to power the two commons. In this example Y0-Y3 are 48V outputs and Y4-Y7 are 10V outputs.

Screenshot_43.jpg

14.2   Configuring Outputs

To configure an output, follow the procedure below.

  1. On the menu bar click on Config->Ports and Pins.
  2. Select the Output Signals
  3. Scroll down to the desired output (There are 20 outputs that can be used).

Screenshot_44.jpg

  1. Enable the output by setting the Enabled box to a green check.
  2. Set the Port Number to 11 and the Pin Number to the corresponding Y number (Y3 would be pin number 3).
  3. Set the Active Low column to a green check for a normally closed signal or red x for normally open.

14.3   Using Outputs

Outputs 5-10 can be controlled with M-Codes. One M-Code turns an output on, and the other M-Code turns the output off. Use the table below for a reference.

Custom M-Codes

Functions

Default Output

M200

Output 5 on

Y2

M201

Output 5 off

M202

Output 6 on

Y3

M203

Output 6 off

M204

Output 7 on

Y4

M205

Output 7 off

M206

Output 8 on

Y5

M207

Output 8 off

M208

Output 9 on

Y6

M209

Output 9 off

M210

Output 10 on

Y7

M211

Output 10 off

Table 19 M-Codes for Outputs

15  Appendices

15.1   Default Factory Settings

These are not the settings required for the system to function correctly. These are the settings as they come from the factory before the setup process described above is completed.

15.1.1 Default Motor Outputs

Signal

Enabled

Step Pin#

Dir Pin#

Dir Low Active

Step Low Active

Step Port

Dir Port

X Axis

X*

0

0

X

ü   

0

0

Y Axis

X*

0

0

X

ü   

0

0

Z Axis

X*

0

0

X

ü   

0

0

A Axis

X*

0

0

X

ü   

0

0

B Axis

X*

0

0

X

ü   

0

0

C Axis

X*

0

0

X

ü   

0

0

Spindle

 ü

0

0

X

ü   

0

0

Table 20 – Default Motor Outputs

*These will be enabled if drives and motors for these axes were purchased with the control.

15.1.2 Default Input Signals

Signal

Enabled

Port #

Pin Number

Active Low

Emulated

HotKey

X++

X

11

1

X

X

0

X--

X

11

1

X

X

0

X Home

X

11

1

X

X

0

Y++

X

11

2

X

X

0

Y--

X

11

2

X

X

0

Y Home

X

11

2

X

X

0

Z++

X

11

3

X

X

0

Z--

X

11

3

X

X

0

Z Home

X

11

3

X

X

0

A++

X

11

4

X

X

0

A--

X

11

4

X

X

0

A Home

X

11

4

X

X

0

B++

X

11

5

X

X

0

B--

X

11

5

X

X

0

B Home

X

11

5

X

X

0

C++

X

11

6

X

X

0

C--

X

11

6

X

X

0

C Home

X

11

6

X

X

0

Estop

ü   

14

5

ü

X

0

OEM Trig #1

ü   

11

0

X

X

0

Table 21 – Default Inputs Signals

15.1.3 Default Output Signals

Signal

Enabled

Port #

Pin Number

Active Low

Digit Trig

X

0

0

X

Enable1

ü   

14

0

X

Enable3

ü   

14

1

X

Output #1

ü

14

6

X

Output #2

ü

14

7

X

Output #3

ü

11

0

X

Output #4

ü

11

1

X

Output #5

ü

11

2

X

Output #6

ü

11

3

X

Output #7

ü

11

4

X

Output #8

ü

11

5

X

Output #9

ü

11

6

X

Output #10

ü

11

7

X

Table 22 – Default Outputs

15.2   Apollo III Drawing

Screenshot_45.jpg

15.3   Apollo III Case Mount Drawing

 Screenshot_46.jpg

16  Appendix

Warranty Information

MachMotion warranty policy is subject to change. Updated information is available at our website:
https://machmotion.com/warranty

 

The MachMotion Team
http://www.machmotion.com
14518 County Road 7240, Newburg, MO 65550
(573) 368-7399 • Fax (573) 341-2672

     

     

     

     

    Back to top